Edward Snell - 1863

from Edward Snell, diary on board the Bolton, London for Melbourne, 1863, page 143:

The Captain grumbled at the sailors for singing 'Cheerly Men' at the topsail halliard instead of hoisting them up hand over hand, so they changed the tune to 'Hurrah my Boys' and the yards went up like smoke. 'Cheerly Men' is a slow-time and the pulls are long and far apart. It goes like this: In London city - hi ho - cheerly men (pull) The girls - are all - pretty - hi, ho, cheerly men (pull) Haul y I oh, cheerly men (pull) Haul y I oh, cheerly men (pull) It sounds very cheerful, but is only used when there are very few hands at the halliards and it is necessary they all pull …   more >>
cite as

Edward Snell, Edward Snell, diary on board the Bolton, London for Melbourne, 1863. In D. Charlwood (ed.), The Long Farewell: Settlers Under Sail (1981), p. 143. https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/entity/lexp/1408719126896 accessed: 5 April, 2020

Listeners

Listening to

hide composers
Sea Songs
written by Edward MacDowell

Experience Information

Date/Time 1863
Medium live
Listening Environment in the company of others, outdoors, in public

Originally submitted by Clare Spencer on Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:52:06 +0100