John George Keysler in Nuremberg - at the end of 1730

from Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4, page 393:

 

The vocal musicians, or singers, who have a great affinity with the bardi and scaldi among the ancient Germans, generally hold their meetings on festivals, and perform even in private houses for money. Music flourishes greatly at Nurenberg [sic], where they have musical meetings, or concerts, which they call krantzel. Fischer on the violin, and Tenner on the German flute, are no mean performers.

cite as

John George Keysler, Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4, volume 4 (London, 1760), p. 393. https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/entity/lexp/1509020607339 accessed: 17 May, 2022

location of experience: Nuremberg

Listeners

John George Keysler
Antiquary, Fellow of the Royal Society London
1689-1743

Listening to

hide composers
violin and German flute performed by Tenner, Fischer

Experience Information

Date/Time at the end of 1730
Medium live

Originally submitted by 5011Henning on Thu, 26 Oct 2017 13:23:27 +0100
Approved on Wed, 03 Jan 2018 17:29:14 +0000