excerpt from 'Anecdotes of Celebrities of London and Paris, to which are added the last recollections of Captain Gronow, formerly of the 1st Foot Guards' pp. 246 (177 words)

excerpt from 'Anecdotes of Celebrities of London and Paris, to which are added the last recollections of Captain Gronow, formerly of the 1st Foot Guards' pp. 246 (177 words)

part of

Anecdotes of Celebrities of London and Paris, to which are added the last recollections of Captain Gronow, formerly of the 1st Foot Guards

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

246

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The Emperor Napoleon I. was passionately fond of Italian music, and wherever the Court stayed, several of the best artistes of the day might be found, who were treated with the greatest consideration. Paesiello was the Emperor's favourite amongst them; indeed, he took an unbounded interest in his success, and was so enchanted one day by a song Paesiello had just written, that he caught him by the hand, saying, "Without doubt you are the greatest composer that ever lived." "No, sire, I am not," replied he; "while Cimarosa lives, to him must be given the palm." Paesiello wrote the opera of "Proserpine," which was brought out at Paris under the auspices of the Emperor; but somehow or other it did not suit the French taste, and proved a failure. Napoleon was furious at the non-success of his protege’s opera, and observed, "It is not to be wondered at, for the French understand nothing of music." Paesiello thought so too; for though so highly patronised by the Emperor and court, he quitted France in disgust.  

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Anecdotes of Celebrities of London and Paris, to which are added the last recollections of Captain Gronow, formerly of the 1st Foot Guards' pp. 246 (177 words)

1437477480340:

reported in source

1437477480340

documented in
Page data computed in 248 ms with 1,647,152 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.