excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 330 (283 words)

excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 330 (283 words)

part of

Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

330

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[Letter XVI] [T]he bottle was put in circulation with a health to "General Breezo;" and, to entertain my friend in a suitable manner, the doctor, who, as caterer, presided at table, sent for M'Murdoch the bagpiper. The Eolus of harmony appeared forthwith, and, having duly prepared himself by the donative of a glass of strong grog, began his performance with "The flowers of Edinburgh," in which the treble pipes went with rapid execution over a number of notes, while the uninterrupted monotonous snorting of one or two larger tubes formed a sostenuto bass-accompaniment of peculiar elegance. Here I had an opportunity of observing how vague and various taste is, and how little it is to be reduced to one standard. The doctor's eyes glistened with joy at the sound of his national air delivered by a countryman of his on his national instrument; while the Neapolitan's frequent yawnings and contortions proclaimed to me at least, the little entertainment he derived from this Highland music. Indeed, on being proudly asked how he liked the tune, he by no means minced his opinion, but broadly declared, that he was glad to see the company so well amused by it, and, on that account, could not but approve of what, afforded pleasure to his friends, even at the expense of his own taste; to follow the dictates of which, he was bound to say, that he would as soon hear the squallings of half a dozen of famished brats, as the grating sounds of so barbarous an instrument. Upon this unexpected remark, our hosts were civil enough to put an end to the first act of the concert by dismissing Mr. M'Murdoch with his bagpipes.

 

[Letter XVI] [T]he bottle was put in circulation with a health to "General Breezo;" and, to entertain my friend in a suitable manner, the doctor, who, as caterer, presided at table, sent for M'Murdoch the bagpiper. The Eolus of harmony appeared forthwith, and, having duly prepared himself by the donative of a glass of strong grog, began his performance with "The flowers of Edinburgh," in which the treble pipes went with rapid execution over a number of notes, while the uninterrupted monotonous snorting of one or two larger tubes formed a sostenuto bass-accompaniment of peculiar elegance. Here I had an opportunity of observing how vague and various taste is, and how little it is to be reduced to one standard. The doctor's eyes glistened with joy at the sound of his national air delivered by a countryman of his on his national instrument; while the Neapolitan's frequent yawnings and contortions proclaimed to me at least, the little entertainment he derived from this Highland music. Indeed, on being proudly asked how he liked the tune, he by no means minced his opinion, but broadly declared, that he was glad to see the company so well amused by it, and, on that account, could not but approve of what, afforded pleasure to his friends, even at the expense of his own taste; to follow the dictates of which, he was bound to say, that he would as soon hear the squallings of half a dozen of famished brats, as the grating sounds of so barbarous an instrument. Upon this unexpected remark, our hosts were civil enough to put an end to the first act of the concert by dismissing Mr. M'Murdoch with his bagpipes.

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excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 330 (283 words)

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