excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 383-384 (359 words)

excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 383-384 (359 words)

part of

Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

383-384

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Some of Don Matteo's melodies approached very nearly to the style of the last-mentioned composer [Päesiello]; they exhibited the same unlaboured, natural expression, the same beautiful simplicity which we admire in Päesiello's works. I was not sparing in my praise, sincere as it came; and the delighted author, encouraged by our approbation, proceeded con amore in the rehearsal, till he came to the finale of the first act. "This," said he, "is the pride of the whole: but you will hear it to great disadvantage, Signor Don Luigi; it requires six voices in the full parts, and including yourself, we can muster but three."—" I take the fourth," exclaimed Don Michele.—"Et moi, je me fais fort du reste," added Mons. B. who had for this half hour, by a humming accompaniment, striven to impress us with an idea of his knowledge of music […] Overjoyed with the discovery of such a combination of talents, Don Matteo assigned the parts, and began. At first the performance proceeded very respectably; but when Don Michele and Monsieur B's turns came to join the ranks, the Sestetto was completely at "sixes and sevens." Not exactly that the spiritual performer was wanting in time; on the contrary, he gave it too liberally: the slow progress of the andante probably proved too tedious to his national vivacity; he went on au pas de charge, yet withal finding sufficient room to interlard his falsetto strains with innumerable decorative graces and flourishes dans le bon genre.---Don Michele, likewise, had a time of his own; so there was abundance of time between them of one sort or other. For the tortured features of Don Matteo's countenance during this severe trial, [see] Hogarth's "Enraged Musician."  Hitherto, however, his good breeding had prevented any severe token of his just displeasure: but when Monsieur B., ere we had come to the bottom of the left page, had already run his race through the right, and, with a volti subito, turned the leaf, Don Matteo's cup of patience overflowed at once; he jumped from his chair, and ran, like a madman, up and down the room.

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excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 383-384 (359 words)

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