excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 342-344 (251 words)

excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 342-344 (251 words)

part of

Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

342-344

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[Engelbach describes at length the events at a dance he hosted in his home with the assistance of his servant Don Michele]

[Letter XVII] But, although not dancing, I was fully employed in another way, as you shall hear:—With all our windows open, the strains of my numerous orchestra propagated their sound over the whole neighbourhood; some of whose inhabitants, impelled by the attraction of sweet sounds, could not resist favouring me with their company. […] As Don Michele, my master of the ceremonies, seemed to know them all, and, moreover, as I could neither help their coming, nor, when once arrived, turn them out, I thought it best to put a good face on the matter, and receive every one, especially the ladies, with a hearty welcome, assigning them places in the adjoining room, where I contrived to form another set of dancers.

 […]

 But to return to my company, now capering away in two of my apartments, I blush to confess that my resolution to keep my toes in a state of sober quiescence was shaken at last. I could have withstood the pressing solicitations of half-a-dozen of these exhilarated damsels, but for the irresistible temptation of their animated example and of the excellent music. Fancy, for once, dear T. the loving smiles, the glistening eyes, the seducing attitudes of these pretty Neapolitan bacchantes, and then ask your conscience how long any Christian, were he even a Quaker or Moravian, could have stood proof against such attraction?

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excerpt from 'Naples and the Campagna Felice. In a series of letters, addressed to a friend in England, in 1802' pp. 342-344 (251 words)

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