excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences Past and Present' pp. 16 (159 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences Past and Present' pp. 16 (159 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences Past and Present

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

16

type

text excerpt

encoded value

 

 

Close to the Conservatorium is the “ S. Thomas Schule,” part of which was once the house of Sebastian Bach, and in the gardens beneath it stands his statue. Deeply interested, I walked under the windows of the large, tall, quaint old building, and eventually found myself gazing at the statue of the most profound musician, the deepest thinker, the hardest worker of all the world’s musical heroes. “ Listen,” I said to my friend, “listen, the choir are singing one of the dear old Cantor’s motets,” as I recognized at once that splendid eight-part unaccompanied work in G Minor: [...] With the greatest firmness, accuracy, and in strict time by a choir of boys and men, was the piece sung, but interrupted occasionally, for I could hear everything distinctly, by the remarks of Dr. Richter, who caused the difficult passages to be sung again and again, until they were delivered perfectly.

 

Close to the Conservatorium is the “ S. Thomas Schule,” part of which was once the house of Sebastian Bach, and in the gardens beneath it stands his statue. Deeply interested, I walked under the windows of the large, tall, quaint old building, and eventually found myself gazing at the statue of the most profound musician, the deepest thinker, the hardest worker of all the world’s musical heroes. “ Listen,” I said to my friend, “listen, the choir are singing one of the dear old Cantor’s motets,” as I recognized at once that splendid eight-part unaccompanied work in G Minor: [...] With the greatest firmness, accuracy, and in strict time by a choir of boys and men, was the piece sung, but interrupted occasionally, for I could hear everything distinctly, by the remarks of Dr. Richter, who caused the difficult passages to be sung again and again, until they were delivered perfectly.

 

Close to the Conservatorium is the “ S. Thomas Schule,” part of which was once the house of Sebastian Bach, and in the gardens beneath it stands his statue. Deeply interested, I walked under the windows of the large, tall, quaint old building, and eventually found myself gazing at the statue of the most profound musician, the deepest thinker, the hardest worker of all the world’s musical heroes. “ Listen,” I said to my friend, “listen, the choir are singing one of the dear old Cantor’s motets,” as I recognized at once that splendid eight-part unaccompanied work in G Minor: [...] With the greatest firmness, accuracy, and in strict time by a choir of boys and men, was the piece sung, but interrupted occasionally, for I could hear everything distinctly, by the remarks of Dr. Richter, who caused the difficult passages to be sung again and again, until they were delivered perfectly.

 

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excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences Past and Present' pp. 16 (159 words)

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