excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Rev. T.S. Whalley, 6 October 1787' pp. 336–337 (158 words)

excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Rev. T.S. Whalley, 6 October 1787' pp. 336–337 (158 words)

part of

Letter from Anna Seward to Rev. T.S. Whalley, 6 October 1787

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

336–337

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Mr Saville being last week at Birmingham oratorios, I could not have the pleasure of introducing him to Mr and Mrs Piozzi; but, as they desired me to bring any of my friends in the afternoon, I took his timid Philomela in my hand. Never had Mr Piozzi two beings of his audience who were more charmed with his perfect expression on his instrument, and with the touching and ever-varying grace with which he sings. Surely the finest sensibilities must vibrate through his frame, since they breathe so sweetly through his song, though his imperfect knowledge of our language prevents their appearing in conversation. I am sure he values, as he ought, the honour and happiness he has obtained, of which the elegances of wealth, and the blessings of independence, form the smallest part. He seemed much pleased with Mrs Smith's voice, and the melting sweetness of her manner in singing, amidst all the disadvantages of her timidity.

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excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Rev. T.S. Whalley, 6 October 1787' pp. 336–337 (158 words)

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1535640620723

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