excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 217-9 (406 words)

excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 217-9 (406 words)

part of

Reminiscences of the Opera

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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217-9

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And now Thursday, the 4th of May, drew nigh. The privileged of the theatre told tales abroad of the appearance of the "Swedish Nightingale" at rehearsal, of her enthusiastic reception by all the members of the orchestra, of her overpowering emotion on facing this tumultuously flattering welcome, and of her undiminished, nay, increased powers. Thursday, the 4th of May came. The scenes of excitement in all the thoroughfares leading to the theatre were once more renewed; again were struggling crowds early at the doors; again were hats doubled up, and dresses torn; and again was the throng of carriages, the clamour and conflict of coachmen, servants, policemen, mob, the same as of yore. A "Jenny Lind crush" had lost nothing of its fever and intensity. The adored prima donna was to make her reappearance in the part which, more than all, had fascinated her enraptured admirers of the previous year, namely, the part of Amina in "La Sonnambula." Words fail to describe the aspect of the overcrowded house, the tumultuous reception, the enthusiasm which knew no bounds and no limits of time, or to give an idea of the prolonged cheering that followed every vocal display on the part of this idol of the public. The house was crowded to a state of impossibility, which eagerness and determination had exercised their magic to make possible. The Court was present ; and an incident, independent of the great event of the evening, is worthy of record. It was the first appearance of the Queen in public, since the famous 10th of April, when English loyalty and English " pluck " had pretty clearly shown that England could have nothing to fear from the revolutionary elements which were just then rife in Europe, driving monarchs from their thrones. When the British Sovereign first reappeared among her subjects, loyalty was not to be baulked of a fitting de- monstration; and in spite of the etiquette of the day, which allowed the Queen, as well as her subjects, to enjoy a dramatic entertainment without interruption, she was received by such universal homage of acclamation, that she was constrained to appear in the front of her box to acknowledge the demonstration, whilst the the National Anthem was sung by the chief singers of the establishment. Well might the newspapers of the day preface their record by the phrase, "The great evening of the season has come off, and the result has been most brilliant."

And now Thursday, the 4th of May, drew nigh. The privileged of the theatre told tales abroad of the appearance of the "Swedish Nightingale" at rehearsal, of her enthusiastic reception by all the members of the orchestra, of her overpowering emotion on facing this tumultuously flattering welcome, and of her undiminished, nay, increased powers. Thursday, the 4th of May came. The scenes of excitement in all the thoroughfares leading to the theatre were once more renewed; again were struggling crowds early at the doors; again were hats doubled up, and dresses torn; and again was the throng of carriages, the clamour and conflict of coachmen, servants, policemen, mob, the same as of yore. A "Jenny Lind crush" had lost nothing of its fever and intensity. The adored prima donna was to make her reappearance in the part which, more than all, had fascinated her enraptured admirers of the previous year, namely, the part of Amina in "La Sonnambula." Words fail to describe the aspect of the overcrowded house, the tumultuous reception, the enthusiasm which knew no bounds and no limits of time, or to give an idea of the prolonged cheering that followed every vocal display on the part of this idol of the public. The house was crowded to a state of impossibility, which eagerness and determination had exercised their magic to make possible. The Court was present ; and an incident, independent of the great event of the evening, is worthy of record. It was the first appearance of the Queen in public, since the famous 10th of April, when English loyalty and English " pluck " had pretty clearly shown that England could have nothing to fear from the revolutionary elements which were just then rife in Europe, driving monarchs from their thrones. When the British Sovereign first reappeared among her subjects, loyalty was not to be baulked of a fitting de- monstration; and in spite of the etiquette of the day, which allowed the Queen, as well as her subjects, to enjoy a dramatic entertainment without interruption, she was received by such universal homage of acclamation, that she was constrained to appear in the front of her box to acknowledge the demonstration, whilst the the National Anthem was sung by the chief singers of the establishment. Well might the newspapers of the day preface their record by the phrase, "The great evening of the season has come off, and the result has been most brilliant."

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excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 217-9 (406 words)

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