excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 221 (197 words)

excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 221 (197 words)

part of

Reminiscences of the Opera

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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221

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Jenny Lind appeared in the part which had first "taken the town by storm," — in the part of Alice, in "Roberto II Diavolo." But, although the public seemed to care for nothing but Jenny Lind, and although all the interest of the opera centred in the great favourite of the day, that same public appeared to resent the mutilation of Meyerbeer's great work: 1st, by the entire suppression of the character of the Princess Isabella, and 2nd, by the omission of two complete acts. The revival was thus a failure in popular esteem, though not in remunerative attraction; for, as has been said, whenever, and whatever "Jenny" sang, the house was crowded to its farthest limits. The "cast," it must be said, lacked the completeness of the previous year, Gardoni (the Raimbaldo of the previous season), favourite though he was, was pronounced not up to the part of Roberto; whilst Beletti, although usually applauded by the.audience in other characters was judged deficient in the depth and intensity necessary to Bertram. Labocetta, the new Raimbaldo, also failed to please. The experiment of the revival of "Roberto il Diavolo," under these conditions, was, therefore, anything but prosperous.

Jenny Lind appeared in the part which had first "taken the town by storm," — in the part of Alice, in "Roberto II Diavolo." But, although the public seemed to care for nothing but Jenny Lind, and although all the interest of the opera centred in the great favourite of the day, that same public appeared to resent the mutilation of Meyerbeer's great work: 1st, by the entire suppression of the character of the Princess Isabella, and 2nd, by the omission of two complete acts. The revival was thus a failure in popular esteem, though not in remunerative attraction; for, as has been said, whenever, and whatever "Jenny" sang, the house was crowded to its farthest limits. The "cast," it must be said, lacked the completeness of the previous year, Gardoni (the Raimbaldo of the previous season), favourite though he was, was pronounced not up to the part of Roberto; whilst Beletti, although usually applauded by the.audience in other characters was judged deficient in the depth and intensity necessary to Bertram. Labocetta, the new Raimbaldo, also failed to please. The experiment of the revival of "Roberto il Diavolo," under these conditions, was, therefore, anything but prosperous.

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excerpt from 'Reminiscences of the Opera' pp. 221 (197 words)

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