excerpt from 'Themes and Conclusions' pp. 223 (112 words)

excerpt from 'Themes and Conclusions' pp. 223 (112 words)

part of

Themes and Conclusions

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

223

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text excerpt

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The tone and provocation of these remarks, in reply to a question about ‘eminent conductors I have known’, are to be traced to a recording of the Brahms First Symphony to which I had just been listening, but which I could not follow, the second beats in the 6/8 movement being so delayed that the time signature might have been 6 ½ /8. I imagined how the conductor would call the distortion emphasis, though it was only weakening exaggeration; and expressive freedom, though the natural rhythmic vitality was corrupted. My mood, therefore, was that of a composer irritated by the impossibility of being played without the editing and the uninteresting comments of his conductors.

The tone and provocation of these remarks, in reply to a question about ‘eminent conductors I have known’, are to be traced to a recording of the Brahms First Symphony to which I had just been listening, but which I could not follow, the second beats in the 6/8 movement being so delayed that the time signature might have been 6 ½ /8. I imagined how the conductor would call the distortion emphasis, though it was only weakening exaggeration; and expressive freedom, though the natural rhythmic vitality was corrupted. My mood, therefore, was that of a composer irritated by the impossibility of being played without the editing and the uninteresting comments of his conductors.

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excerpt from 'Themes and Conclusions' pp. 223 (112 words)

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