excerpt from 'Letter from Horace Walpole to the Countess of Upper Ossory, 25 July 1781' pp. 30–31 (172 words)

excerpt from 'Letter from Horace Walpole to the Countess of Upper Ossory, 25 July 1781' pp. 30–31 (172 words)

part of

Letter from Horace Walpole to the Countess of Upper Ossory, 25 July 1781

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

30–31

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Poor human nature, what a contradiction it is! to-day it is all rheumatism and morality, and sits with a death’s head before it: to-morrow it is dancing! […]

[L]ast night we went to Lady Hertford at Ditton. Soon after, Lady North and her daughters arrived, and besides Lady Elizabeth and Lady Bel Conways, there were their brothers Hugh and George. All the jeunesse strolled about the garden. We ancients, with the Earl and Colonel Keene, retired from the dew into the drawing-room. Soon after, the two youths and seven nymphs came in, and shut the door of the hall. In a moment we heard a burst of laughter, and thought we distinguished something like the scraping of a fiddle. My curiosity was raised, I opened the door and found four couples and a half standing up, and a miserable violin from the ale-house. ‘Oh,’ said I, ‘Lady Bel shall not want a partner;’ I threw away my stick, and me voilà dansant comme un charme!

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excerpt from 'Letter from Horace Walpole to the Countess of Upper Ossory, 25 July 1781' pp. 30–31 (172 words)

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1534782175144

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