excerpt from 'Letters from the North of Italy, Addressed to Henry Hallam, Esq., in Two Volumes' pp. 200-201 (184 words)

excerpt from 'Letters from the North of Italy, Addressed to Henry Hallam, Esq., in Two Volumes' pp. 200-201 (184 words)

part of

Letters from the North of Italy, Addressed to Henry Hallam, Esq., in Two Volumes

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

200-201

type

text excerpt

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[Letter XVII, Vol. 1]

Though the present professor had softened down his guttural and aspirated pronunciation, I soon recognized him for a Florentine, by certain singularities of expression, which distinguish his fellow citizens. These, indeed, who may be styled omnium elegantiarum amantissimi, are peculiarly gifted with the powers of extemporary composition, and, of a fine evening in Florence, you may see the streets swarming with the lower orders, who have transformed themselves into rhapsodists, or gallants. For there, the workman, who has finished his daily task, instead of expending his little gains at the wine house, equips himself with a good coat and guitar, and catches immediate inspiration from what he would, I suppose, call the mantle and the lyre.

 The Tuscans, and more particularly the Florentines, are distinguished for this talent; but it is common over Italy and the Italian isles. An English General, at an inspection of troops, having asked some questions of a Corsican drummer-boy, was surprized by his answering him in octave rhyme. There are dozens of tailors and tinkers, in this country, who are capable of as bold a flight.

 

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excerpt from 'Letters from the North of Italy, Addressed to Henry Hallam, Esq., in Two Volumes' pp. 200-201 (184 words)

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