excerpt from 'Letter from Paul Hainlein to Friedrich Behaim, 11 October 1647' pp. 571-572 (340 words)

excerpt from 'Letter from Paul Hainlein to Friedrich Behaim, 11 October 1647' pp. 571-572 (340 words)

part of

Letter from Paul Hainlein to Friedrich Behaim, 11 October 1647

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

571-572

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Most Noble and Excellent Sir, to whom is due my willing and bounden service, at all times ready according to my best abilities, I did not wish to neglect informing Your Worship with this little letter that I arrived in Venice safe and sound, thank God, and was rather looking forward to hearing some music.  I have already heard some in four or five different churches, and it was quite good.  One service among them, by far the best, took place last Saturday just before the evening hour [6 p.m.] in S. Giovanni e Paolo, on the Feast of Our Lady’s Rosary [Sunday 6 October] and lasted until 3 hours at night [9 p.m.]

               

 

The church was hung with beautiful paintings and tapestries, and in addition a platform was set up within the choir on which the musicians with the four positives were placed.  At first the organists preluded one after the other, and after this the psalms began, Dixit Dominus being the first.

               

 

But throughout the evening between each psalm a sonata or a motet was performed, among them a Romanesca which a bass-singer and his choirboys sang with delightful style.  There were also several foreign vocalists present; the group consisted in all of 36 to 40 persons.  The music was composed by Signor Rovetta.  The following Sunday at early Mass and at Vespers in the evening, music was again performed.  Among other pieces something was played before the psalm Nisi Dominus as four trombones sounded an introduction and a single alto singer joined with them.  He stood at the side while singing with them, while another far off responded in echo.  Soon afterwards he came forward and continued singing as the first alto and the trombones disappeared.

               

 

Meanwhile, however, six vocalists and violinists together with the director, came forward onto the platform and sat down until the alto had finished.  These soon began the above-mentioned psalm, and the other instruments and voices gradually joined them until the choir was again complete.  This was very pleasing to listen to at night.

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excerpt from 'Letter from Paul Hainlein to Friedrich Behaim, 11 October 1647' pp. 571-572 (340 words)

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