excerpt from 'Music, men and manners in France and Italy, 1770 / Charles Burney' pp. 196 (202 words)

excerpt from 'Music, men and manners in France and Italy, 1770 / Charles Burney' pp. 196 (202 words)

part of

Music, men and manners in France and Italy, 1770 / Charles Burney

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

196

type

text excerpt

encoded value

After dinner a complete band was assembled in the gallery and we had music there till past 11 o’clock – Barbella pleased me to night much more than before – he is very certain of his tone and has a great deal of taste and expression; if he equalled Giordini in brilliancy and in fullness of tone his playing would be unexceptionable and perhaps superior to most of the players in Europe. Orgitano played the harpsichord pretty well too, and Signore Consorte, a musico, was there to sing. – There was likewise a pretty good solo hautbois. – We had all given Caffarielli over – when behold he came in high good humour and contrary to all expectation was prevailed on to sing. Many notes in his voice are now thin, but there are still traits in his performance sufficient to convince one of his having been an amazing fine singer. He accompanied himself and sung without other instrument than the harpsichord. Expression and grace with great neatness in all he attempts are his characteristics – both Barbella and he are Bolisarius[e]s, rather in ruin than otherwise, but what remains of them is but the more precious for it.

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excerpt from 'Music, men and manners in France and Italy, 1770 / Charles Burney' pp. 196 (202 words)

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