excerpt from 'The culture of music amongst the masses in Wales' pp. 334 (161 words)

excerpt from 'The culture of music amongst the masses in Wales' pp. 334 (161 words)

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The culture of music amongst the masses in Wales

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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334

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      [The cymanfa ganu] commences, as a rule, with a children’s service in the morning, when light and suitable tunes are sung and the catechism gone through….

      The afternoon and evening meetings are devoted to adults. A number of congregational tunes are sung at each meeting, interspersed with anthems, chants and choruses. The choir, which is made of those of the several chapels in the Union, ranges from 300 to 800, according to the population of the district, and, after a thorough training, the singing, which is always devotional, is often very majestic and highly impressive… In several places the choir is assisted by a small band...

     Strangers labour under the impression that the best Welsh singing is to be heard at the National Eisteddfod. Picked choirs sing there, but the masses are to be heard at the Cymanfa Ganu, and anyone who would make himself acquainted with the musical life of Wales should visit some of our popular Cymanfaoedd.

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excerpt from 'The culture of music amongst the masses in Wales' pp. 334 (161 words)

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