excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 343 (152 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 343 (152 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

343

type

text excerpt

encoded value

In the first place, whether opera, symphony, stringed quartet, or any other variety of concerted music be announced in the bill, all the German youths and maidens present who have a mind to prove by demonstration that they know all about it, and no mistake, bring full scores, oblong in form, with them, and turn over the leaves during the performance in a flappy way that is peculiarly irritating to the auditor who happens to be listening for his pleasure, and not to show other people how intensely, absorbingly, far-more-than-professionally musical he is. I used to find a gloomy consolation for the annoyance inflicted upon me by these disturbers of my peace in observing how hard Nature had been upon them in connection with their personal appearance. No pretty girl or tolerably good-looking younker ever turned over the leaves of a score in any Berlin theatre or concert-room when I was present. 

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excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 343 (152 words)

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