excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' (127 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' (127 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

242

type

text excerpt

encoded value

In no executive branch of the musical art has a more striking and general advancement been achieved in this metropolis [London] within the past quarter of a century than in that portion of theatrical entertainments which consists of orchestral performances, such as may be heard every night in any London theatre, agreeably prefacing the play or plays on the bill of the evening, and, in one or two instances, making the entr'actes or "waits," even more recreative to the audience than the stage business itself. A good band is nowadays well nigh as essential an attraction to a metropolitan playhouse as a good acting company; and the former may be counted upon by the public with even more confidence than the latter, taking one theatre with another.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' (127 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 242 (127 words)

1451910654743:

reported in source

1451910654743

documented in
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