excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 228-229 (128 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 228-229 (128 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

228-229

type

text excerpt

encoded value

As it is universally admitted by members of the craft that Liszt has been, for at least fifty years of his life, pre-eminent amongst pianoforte players in interpretation, execution and improvisation alike, there is, I think, abundant justification for the belief I have entertained ever since I first heard him perform — namely, that he is in all respects the greatest pianist who ever lived. This, moreover, was Kichard Wagner's opinion of him. Wagner, who was not given to hero-worship, and whose capacity for enthusiasm was always kept under control by his critical faculty, frequently confessed that words failed him to express his wondering admiration of the gift that enabled Liszt to invest himself with the personality of whatsoever composer whose works he might be engaged in rendering.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 228-229 (128 words)

1451829790018:

reported in source

1451829790018

documented in
Page data computed in 323 ms with 1,698,784 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.