excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 239-240 (155 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 239-240 (155 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

239-240

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Vladimir de Pachmann has of late been so frequently heard in English concert-rooms and salons, and, during the past season, has achieved so unequivocal a status here as a popular favourite, that I may confine my remarks upon his pianism within a very brief space. As an interpreter of Chopin he is probably unrivalled at the present time. Since the death of that composer no executant — except, perhaps, the inimitable Princess Czartoryska, who was taught by Chopin himself — has made the true meaning and sentiment of his works so vividly manifest to the public as his compatriot, M. de Pachmann...His répertoire is comprehensive, and he plays all manner of music with excellent taste, delicacy, and finish; but Chopin is distinctly his speciality. For endurance he is entitled to rank on an equal footing with Eubinstein and Joseffy — "les deux inépuisables,'' as Madame de Schleinitz once aptly styled them.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 239-240 (155 words)

1451908067346:

reported in source

1451908067346

documented in
Page data computed in 302 ms with 1,699,168 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.