excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 11-13 (325 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 11-13 (325 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

11-13

type

text excerpt

encoded value

One afternoon, during the early summer of 1868 — a few days after the first production at Munich of the " Meistersinger von Nuernberg" — I chanced to call in at the gloomy old practice-room in the Tuchlauben, just as the students were settling down at their desks, with faces, as it struck me upon glancing round the semi-circle, a thought graver than usual. Hellmesberger was already enthroned; but as soon as he caught sight of me he jumped up, evidently in a great state of excitement, grasped both my hands, and exclaimed — "How fortunate that thou shouldst have visited us to-day ! Now I will show thee what these children can do. The full score of the “Meistersinger ' has just reached us, and I am now going to take them a prima vista through the overture."  So saying, he gave the accustomed three quick, smart raps, and a breathless silence succeeded the clamour of tuning and chatter that had hitherto prevailed […].To say that I was surprised at the general correctness, vigour, and fire with which this heterogeneous gathering of lads and lasses interpreted one of the most laborious and intricate orchestral compositions in existence, is to describe very inadequately the sensations I experienced upon listening to the " Meistersinger " Overture, played at sight by the students of the Vienna Conservatorium. That the rendering was somewhat coarse and rough, shaky as to time here and there, and lacking in light and shade throughout, I do not contest. But not a single break- down occurred, nor was the orchestra pulled up once by its conductor; whose face was radiant with pride and pleasure when he laid down his baton at the conclusion of the Vorspiel. All he said was "Kinder, es war gar nicht so schlecht!" (Children, it was really not so bad) ; upon which the “ children " set up a cheering and clapping of hands that obviously afforded their gifted instructor the liveliest gratification.

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excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 11-13 (325 words)

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