excerpt from 'Music, Men and Manners in France and Italy 1770' pp. 83-4 (215 words)

excerpt from 'Music, Men and Manners in France and Italy 1770' pp. 83-4 (215 words)

part of

Music, men and manners in France and Italy, 1770 / Charles Burney

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

83-4

type

text excerpt

encoded value

I was again to night alla casa Grimani […] I am ashamed to say that this concert, I was told was designed as a regale for me in particular. The band was numerous – Signor Sacchini at the harpsichord and to sing, there was an abate who sung in the most exquisite taste: and with great difficulty Signora Regina Zocchi had been prevailed on to come […] She has a powerful voice and sings charmingly with great execution in allegros and execution in slow movements. But now comes the most curious part of the tale. I was obliged by general solicitation to sit down at the harpsichord (I had not seen one since Madame Brillon’s). I would just as readily have submitted to the discipline of the salt canals of Venice, as this ceremony – but there was no retreat. I played a voluntary, for I could neither see or remember anything I was so frightened. However the politeness of the company extended to general applause and compliments without end from the professors. I then presented her excellence Signora Bassa with a movement of my own which I had transcribed with design to play it first – but durst not. Her excellence received it very graciously and seemed even much obliged by it.

I was again to night alla casa Grimani […] I am ashamed to say that this concert, I was told was designed as a regale for me in particular. The band was numerous – Signor Sacchini at the harpsichord and to sing, there was an abate who sung in the most exquisite taste: and with great difficulty Signora Regina Zocchi had been prevailed on to come […] She has a powerful voice and sings charmingly with great execution in allegros and execution in slow movements. But now comes the most curious part of the tale. I was obliged by general solicitation to sit down at the harpsichord (I had not seen one since Madame Brillon’s). I would just as readily have submitted to the discipline of the salt canals of Venice, as this ceremony – but there was no retreat. I played a voluntary, for I could neither see or remember anything I was so frightened. However the politeness of the company extended to general applause and compliments without end from the professors. I then presented her excellence Signora Bassa with a movement of my own which I had transcribed with design to play it first – but durst not. Her excellence received it very graciously and seemed even much obliged by it.

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excerpt from 'Music, Men and Manners in France and Italy 1770' pp. 83-4 (215 words)

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