excerpt from 'The Correspondence of Sir Roger Newdigate of Arbury Warwickshire 1731-1806' pp. S. 2 (185 words)

excerpt from 'The Correspondence of Sir Roger Newdigate of Arbury Warwickshire 1731-1806' pp. S. 2 (185 words)

part of

The Correspondence of Sir Roger Newdigate of Arbury Warwickshire 1731-1806

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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S. 2

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text excerpt

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Letter from Roger Newdigate to his mother Elizabeth Newdigate

11 March 1733 [1735]

My Lady Sedley & Sir Charles desires their services, I was at her house to dinner on Saturday last when she took me to the Opera, where I heard the famous Fannello [Farinelli] who I think (& you know I’m a great judge of musick & a perfect master in the art of whistling) very well deserves his character & is the most extraordinary person I ever heard. You may think after the charms of his voice, how I shall bear the noise of rooks and the quawking of your Ladyship ducks, & the solitary walks near purling rills, with what you country ladies think so charming, the pleasing sonnets of the airy choir, which will appear to me, worse than the shrieking of a violin ill play’d on. I shall die to befoul my fingers with a filthy hoe & shall address your Ladyship in nothing but Italian now & Fannello’s [Farinelli] praises.
I hope you will excuse these airy flights which may seem odd to you but are common & fashionable and therefore necessary to us town gentlemen.

Letter from Roger Newdigate to his mother Elizabeth Newdigate

11 March 1733 [1735]

My Lady Sedley & Sir Charles desires their services, I was at her house to dinner on Saturday last when she took me to the Opera, where I heard the famous Fannello [Farinelli] who I think (& you know I’m a great judge of musick & a perfect master in the art of whistling) very well deserves his character & is the most extraordinary person I ever heard. You may think after the charms of his voice, how I shall bear the noise of rooks and the quawking of your Ladyship ducks, & the solitary walks near purling rills, with what you country ladies think so charming, the pleasing sonnets of the airy choir, which will appear to me, worse than the shrieking of a violin ill play’d on. I shall die to befoul my fingers with a filthy hoe & shall address your Ladyship in nothing but Italian now & Fannello’s [Farinelli] praises. I hope you will excuse these airy flights which may seem odd to you but are common & fashionable and therefore necessary to us town gentlemen.

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excerpt from 'The Correspondence of Sir Roger Newdigate of Arbury Warwickshire 1731-1806' pp. S. 2 (185 words)

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