excerpt from 'Letters of composers : an anthology, 1603-1945 / compiled and edited by Gertrude Norman and Miriam Lubell Shrifte.' pp. 272,273 (153 words)

excerpt from 'Letters of composers : an anthology, 1603-1945 / compiled and edited by Gertrude Norman and Miriam Lubell Shrifte.' pp. 272,273 (153 words)

part of

Letters of composers : an anthology, 1603-1945 / compiled and edited by Gertrude Norman and Miriam Lubell Shrifte.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

272,273

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Do you want to know something? They don’t believe in their own music. They think it’s put together well, modern, but they are the first to be bored stiff by it. But of course they have to do it that way or pay the penalty of being pretentious, like that damned Weber or that old dolt of a Father Beethoven! / Hypothesis: if one of them could, oh so reluctantly, write a Freischütz Overture some fine morning, he wouldn’t dare show it. The fact is it’s lousy with melody. Damned if I know where Weber’s mind was that day. What’s good about it? I can hear the Oberon Overture twenty times in succession; I could’t listen twice to the “Bénédiction des poignards”; and I’ve had my fill of one as much as other.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Letters of composers : an anthology, 1603-1945 / compiled and edited by Gertrude Norman and Miriam Lubell Shrifte.' pp. 272,273 (153 words)

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reported in source

1424769495821

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