excerpt from 'With strings attached- Reminiscences and reflections, 2nd edition, enlarge' pp. 308-309 (204 words)

excerpt from 'With strings attached- Reminiscences and reflections, 2nd edition, enlarge' pp. 308-309 (204 words)

part of

With strings attached- Reminiscences and reflections, 2nd edition, enlarge

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

308-309

type

text excerpt

encoded value

It must have been in 1932 or 1933, before Vienna had awakened to the acuteness of the Nazi menace; Josephine Baker, the Negro star from Paris, was drawing packed houses at the premier night club of the capital; the Social-Democratic Arbeiter Sinfonie Konzerte were playing all the advanced symphonic works which later were labeled “Entartete Kunst” (Degenerate Art) by the Nazis; /Szigeti gave a recital under my management featuring this then much-discussed work with the famous “Blues” movement. / In all my long managerial experience, this was the first time that such a “bagarre” developed at a recital in venerable Musikvereins-Saall After the Blues, hoots and cries of “Negermusik!” and “Pfui” from the few Nazi provocateurs back of the orchestra stalls soon developed into a free fight, in the course of which the rowdies were ejected. Little did we realize that incidents like these, which we minimized then-they were repeated nightly at Josephine Baker’s performances too- were all part of the Nazi master plan: to lump all exotic, advanced art- Stravinsky, Picasso, Schoenberg, Alban Berg, Kandinsky, Marian Anderson, whatever it might be- together as “Negroid” and discredit it as unworthy of the Aryan.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'With strings attached- Reminiscences and reflections, 2nd edition, enlarge' pp. 308-309 (204 words)

1434461324434:

reported in source

1434461324434

documented in
Page data computed in 324 ms with 1,769,664 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.