excerpt from 'Igor Stravinsky: An Autobiography' pp. 150-151 (169 words)

excerpt from 'Igor Stravinsky: An Autobiography' pp. 150-151 (169 words)

part of

Igor Stravinsky: An Autobiography

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

150-151

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Unfortunately, therefore, the rendering recorded by the author fails to achieve its most important object - that of safeguarding his work by establishing the manner in which it ought to be played. This is all the more regrettable since it is not a question of a haphazard gramophone record of just any performance. Far from that, the very purpose of the work on these records is the elimination of all chance elements by selecting from among the different records those which are most successful. It is obvious that in even the very best records one may come across certain defects such as crackling, a rough surface, excessive or insufficient resonance. But these defects, which, for that matter, can be more or less corrected by the gramophone and the choice of the needle, do not in the least affect the essential thing, without which it would be impossible to form any idea of the composition – I refer to the pace of the movements and their relationship to one another.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Igor Stravinsky: An Autobiography' pp. 150-151 (169 words)

1435682769143:

reported in source

1435682769143

documented in
Page data computed in 330 ms with 1,833,960 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.