excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 169-71 (256 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 169-71 (256 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

169-71

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Having heard her [Pasta] once before at a private concert, with, I own, less pleasure than I had anticipated, I had much curiosity to see her on the stage, and there she fully answered my highest expectations. In a small room her voice was too loud, and sometimes harsh; her manner too forcible and vehement: but in the theatre all blemishes disappeared: she is really a first-rate performer, both as singer and actress, and that by mere dint of talent, without any very pre-eminent natural qualifications; for, though a pretty woman, her figure is short and not graceful; and her voice, though powerful and extensive, is not of the very finest quality, not free from defects. No part could be more calculated to display her powers than that of Medea, which affords opportunities for the deepest pathos, and the most energetic passion. In both she was eminently successful, and her performance both surprized and delighted me. None since Banti’s had equalled it, and perhaps she even excelled her great predecessor as an actress, though in quality and sweetness of voice she infinitely falls short of her. It would be unfair not to add that the whole opera was well performed. Caradori acted and sung charmingly, the tender, gentle part of Creusa, and Curioni was animated and effective in that of Jason. Even the second tenor, Torri, who possesses a very sweet, but feeble voice, filled very creditably the part assigned to him. He has much taste, and is a pleasing singer in a room.

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excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 169-71 (256 words)

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1446823931858

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