excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 146-7 (214 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 146-7 (214 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

146-7

type

text excerpt

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There is another species of composition more peculiarly our own, and which I should call our only national music; I mean our glees, which differ from any thing I ever heard, and in their style cannot be excelled. Their harmony is so full, rich, and melodious, when executed, as they long were, by the Messrs. Knyvett, and the other performers accustomed to sing them together, that they completely gratify the ear, and he must be indeed fastidious, or greatly prejudiced, who cannot receive pleasure from their performance. I do not know of any female singer at present who has exclusively devoted herself to this kind of music, but there have been several; and none who do not keep solely to it can execute them with equal propriety. If the leading voice permits itself to wander from the strict melody of the air, in order to show graces or agility, as is too frequently the case when singers accustomed to other styles are called in, the effect is injured instead of being improved, as the great beauty of those compositions is derived from the complete union and equality of all the voices, none preponderating, and from the simplicity of their execution. They then produce the effect of full chords struck on a finely toned organ.

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excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 146-7 (214 words)

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1446814069686

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