excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 199-201 (228 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 199-201 (228 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

199-201

type

text excerpt

encoded value

So much had been said of her [Catalani] falling off, and of the failure of her voice, that I was most agreeably sur-prised at finding how little change there was in her, and how well she had retained her powers during so long a period, and when arrived to at least middle age. It was, indeed, still beyond any other younger voice. She said herself that she had lost some of its upper notes; but, she added, she had gained in expression what she had lost in compass, and therefore was, on the whole, a gainer. This was, indeed, true. She sung several songs in a style that no one else can equal, and concluded the concert with “God save the King,” and “Rule Britannia,” which last I always thought she sang better than any body. So she did on this occasion. It electrified and enraptured the audience. In myself, it excited feelings with which music had long ceased to inspire me: it was impossible to restrain them. It may seem strange that in her latter years she should please me more than in the most brilliant part of her career. But so it was; and I now found out that, although at that time I liked her less than some of her predecessors, I now liked her better than most of her successors.

So much had been said of her [Catalani] falling off, and of the failure of her voice, that I was most agreeably sur-prised at finding how little change there was in her, and how well she had retained her powers during so long a period, and when arrived to at least middle age. It was, indeed, still beyond any other younger voice. She said herself that she had lost some of its upper notes; but, she added, she had gained in expression what she had lost in compass, and therefore was, on the whole, a gainer. This was, indeed, true. She sung several songs in a style that no one else can equal, and concluded the concert with “God save the King,” and “Rule Britannia,” which last I always thought she sang better than any body. So she did on this occasion. It electrified and enraptured the audience. In myself, it excited feelings with which music had long ceased to inspire me: it was impossible to restrain them. It may seem strange that in her latter years she should please me more than in the most brilliant part of her career. But so it was; and I now found out that, although at that time I liked her less than some of her predecessors, I now liked her better than most of her successors.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 199-201 (228 words)

1447063940500:

reported in source

1447063940500

documented in
Page data computed in 378 ms with 1,736,128 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.