excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 258-60 (258 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 258-60 (258 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

258-60

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The part begun with a recitative and air by Madame Stockhausen, “On mighty pens the eagle wings.” The song is a descriptive one, meant to express the notes of various birds. Such imitations are generally more fanciful than exact, but it is pleasing, and Madame Stockhausen sung it well. The next two pieces deserving mention, both as compositions and for the manner in which they were executed, were the recitative, “And God said,” and the air, “Now Heaven in fullest glory shone,” and that immediately following, the recitative, “And God created man,” with the air, “In native worth,” the first sung by Mr. E. Seguin, the last by Mr. Sapio. Of these two singers I have given my opinion above, and can only again express my surprise and regret that they were heard no more.

The chorus concluding the second part of the Oratorio, “Achieved is the glorious Work,” and ending with “Hallelujah,” is exceedingly good. And here it were to be wished the whole had ended. The account of the Creation is complete, and the third part, containing only some dialogues and duets by Adam and Eve, is a useless addition. Though some of the melodies are very sweet, its prevailing character is languor and insipidity, without one spirited or enlivening piece to give it variety. Neither were any singers employed in it likely to remove those defects. The whole was flat, vapid, and unimpressive, I must therefore decline noticing it more particularly.

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excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 258-60 (258 words)

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1448972027684

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