excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 190-1 (136 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 190-1 (136 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

190-1

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The other parts of Don Giovanni were unequally filled. Caradori (whose benefit it was) sung sweetly, as she always does, that of Zerlina. Zuchelli, who is lately arrived, as the hero of the piece, was less lively and animated, and far less the libertine, than the original representative, Ambrogetti, but sung the part much better, from the superior excellence of his voice, and greater delicacy of his manner, a quality in which he surpasses every bass singer I ever heard. Pellegrini, the Leporello, is a good buffo, but past his prime, and has nearly lost his voice. It was to be regretted that Curioni did not perform the tenor part, so well sung formerly by Crevelli; and the inferior characters were all less well filled than on its first performance in this country, and subsequent revivals.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 190-1 (136 words)

1447063241953:

reported in source

1447063241953

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