excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 188-9 (295 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 188-9 (295 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

188-9

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Mademoiselle Sontag, who is a very young, and certainly a pretty woman (from countenance and complexion rather than features), though far from being so transcendently handsome as represented, possesses a voice of great extent, brilliant clearness, and correct intonation. The upper notes are particularly good and pleasing, but the lower part of her voice is less sweet, and when forced beyond its natural strength, may be called rather shrill. It is not, in short, a true voce di petto, and has not the round, full, mellow tone peculiar almost to the Italians. Her powers of execution are very great, and the facility with which she performs difficult passages has perhaps never been surpassed. There is no appearance of effort or exertion, and no instrument could execute more neatly or correctly. But there is a want of feeling and expression, both in the tone of her voice and her manner of singing, which (if the truth be confessed) render her a less satisfactory singer than many who have not her powers or talent. She appears to excel most (as it is natural she should) in the music of her own country in her native language. An air which I have twice heard her sing from the Freyschütz with the original words, was very beautiful, and she executed it with a simplicity that made it truly delightful. It may be said, to her praise, that she is not lavish of ornament for the sake of showing of what she is capable. Of the theatrical performance I witnessed I am sorry not to be able to speak with equal commendation. The part of Donna Anna does not suit her, and by over exerting her voice, especially in the concerted pieces, the shrillness alluded to was more apparent.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 188-9 (295 words)

1446824933321:

reported in source

1446824933321

documented in
Page data computed in 308 ms with 1,714,528 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.