excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 47-9 (201 words)

excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 47-9 (201 words)

part of

Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

47-9

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Yet such was the admirable manner in which this prodigious band was conducted by Mr. Bates at the organ, and Cramer as leader, that not even the smallest ever executed music with greater precision. It was as one instrument. […] The chorusses too were performed with equal excellence, under the direction of the most able musical professors. The first singer on all these occasions, was Madame Mara, who had come to England to sing at the Pantheon concerts. All the best Italian as well as English singers were engaged. The music was confined to that of Handel, the burst of one of whose chorusses caused a general thrill, and was sublime beyond imagination. Yet from the vastness of that venerable pile, never was the fullest piece of music in the least degree too loud even to those who were near the orchestra, while its construction was so favourable to sound, that Mara’s single voice, or Cramer’s single fiddle, were heard most distinctly in every part. It was remarkable that even the tuning of this immense band, generally so discordant, accompanied as it was by the full chords of a noble organ, produced a fine and harmonious effect.

 

Yet such was the admirable manner in which this prodigious band was conducted by Mr. Bates at the organ, and Cramer as leader, that not even the smallest ever executed music with greater precision. It was as one instrument. […] The chorusses too were performed with equal excellence, under the direction of the most able musical professors. The first singer on all these occasions, was Madame Mara, who had come to England to sing at the Pantheon concerts. All the best Italian as well as English singers were engaged. The music was confined to that of Handel, the burst of one of whose chorusses caused a general thrill, and was sublime beyond imagination. Yet from the vastness of that venerable pile, never was the fullest piece of music in the least degree too loud even to those who were near the orchestra, while its construction was so favourable to sound, that Mara’s single voice, or Cramer’s single fiddle, were heard most distinctly in every part. It was remarkable that even the tuning of this immense band, generally so discordant, accompanied as it was by the full chords of a noble organ, produced a fine and harmonious effect.

 

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excerpt from 'Musical Reminiscences: Containing an Account of Italian Opera in England, From 1773. The Fourth Edition, Continued to the Present Time, and Including The Festival in Westminster Abbey.' pp. 47-9 (201 words)

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1446636156055

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