excerpt from 'Childhood: an autobiography of a boy from 1889-1906' pp. 58-59 (354 words)

excerpt from 'Childhood: an autobiography of a boy from 1889-1906' pp. 58-59 (354 words)

part of

Childhood: an autobiography of a boy from 1889-1906

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

58-59

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[In 1906 Edward Stewart-Humphries joined the 5th Battalion Rifle Brigade Militia, spending a three-month training period in Woolwich]

 

I regretted the closing of the Camp but thoroughly enjoyed the Camp Concert held on the night before the disbandment of the trained Militiamen. 

 

Barrels of beer were on tap as we sat gathered around a huge Camp fire and as the evening wore on the merriment increased. The Battalion songsters were many and once throats were well oiled the whole Battalion joined in the choruses of such favourites as “Any Old Iron”, “See You’ve Got Your Old Brown Hat On”, ‘Down at the Old Bull and Bush”. As time passed the troops became more mellow and sentimental; eyes moistened and hearts throbbed with maudlin simplicity as they sang the refrain:

 

Are we to part like this, Bill,

Are we to part this way.

Is it to be you and me,

Don’t be afraid to say. 

If everything’s over between us

Don’t ever pass me by, 

For you and me still friends can be,

For the sake of the days gone by.

 

Later still the Cockney-Irish element of the Battalion increased the tempo of sentiment with several heart-rending songs from Ireland. The British soldier loves sentimental songs, whether they come from Ireland, Wales, the County Regiments or from over the Border. They all joined the choruses with gusto. The last chorus, towards midnight, when the beer barrels were running dry, was repeated again and again, each time with greater feeling than before:

 

They laid him away on the Hillside,

Along with the brave and the bold,

They inscribed his name

On the scroll of fame

In letters of purest gold. 

My comrades will never forget me,

He said with his last dying breath, 

May God grant us our Freedom

[Line missing from scan of document]

 

At that time I knew little or nothing about Home Rule for Ireland, but being somewhat a sentimentalist, I can remember feeling overcome with sadness for the Irish patriot (who was probably a Cockney born and bred) as I left the Camp fire to return to my tent. 

[In 1906 Edward Stewart-Humphries joined the 5th Battalion Rifle Brigade Militia, spending a three-month training period in Woolwich]

 

I regretted the closing of the Camp but thoroughly enjoyed the Camp Concert held on the night before the disbandment of the trained Militiamen. 

 

Barrels of beer were on tap as we sat gathered around a huge Camp fire and as the evening wore on the merriment increased. The Battalion songsters were many and once throats were well oiled the whole Battalion joined in the choruses of such favourites as “Any Old Iron”, “See You’ve Got Your Old Brown Hat On”, ‘Down at the Old Bull and Bush”. As time passed the troops became more mellow and sentimental; eyes moistened and hearts throbbed with maudlin simplicity as they sang the refrain:

 

Are we to part like this, Bill,

Are we to part this way.

Is it to be you and me,

Don’t be afraid to say. 

If everything’s over between us

Don’t ever pass me by, 

For you and me still friends can be,

For the sake of the days gone by.

 

Later still the Cockney-Irish element of the Battalion increased the tempo of sentiment with several heart-rending songs from Ireland. The British soldier loves sentimental songs, whether they come from Ireland, Wales, the County Regiments or from over the Border. They all joined the choruses with gusto. The last chorus, towards midnight, when the beer barrels were running dry, was repeated again and again, each time with greater feeling than before:

 

They laid him away on the Hillside,

Along with the brave and the bold,

They inscribed his name

On the scroll of fame

In letters of purest gold. 

My comrades will never forget me,

He said with his last dying breath, 

May God grant us our Freedom

[Line missing from scan of document]

 

At that time I knew little or nothing about Home Rule for Ireland, but being somewhat a sentimentalist, I can remember feeling overcome with sadness for the Irish patriot (who was probably a Cockney born and bred) as I left the Camp fire to return to my tent. 

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Childhood: an autobiography of a boy from 1889-1906' pp. 58-59 (354 words)

1541269775862:

reported in source

1541269775862

documented in
Page data computed in 316 ms with 1,556,152 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.