excerpt from 'Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 12 February 2019), June 1769, trial of Thomas Meller , otherwise Brooks (t17690628-8)' (430 words)

excerpt from 'Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 12 February 2019), June 1769, trial of Thomas Meller , otherwise Brooks (t17690628-8)' (430 words)

part of

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 12 February 2019), June 1769, trial of Thomas Meller , otherwise Brooks (t17690628-8)

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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text excerpt

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[Thomas Meller was found guilty on 28 June 1769 of raping Mary Warnett. He was executed on 26 July 1769]

 

Mary Curtain: I fancy [Mary Warnett and I] might stay there [the Bull's Head] about an hour, or an hour and a half. The prisoner sung, and that other man [Litchfield] came in, and begged of him to sing. He sung a good many songs. We both got up, and immediately insisted upon going, and they said we should not, they would go presently, and would see us safe home. I rung the bell for the waiter to come and take the reckoning. The prisoner sent him away, and said he did not want to go; he would have another pot of beer. I said, You may have as many pots of beer as you will; but we will go. The gentleman said he should sing another song. Warnett paid the reckoning. She got upon the table to come away, and the prisoner pulled her off the table.

[…]

 

For the Prisoner

William Jackson: I am a slender acquaintance of the prisoner's. I saw him on that Thursday between five and six-o'clock at the Bull-Head at Haggerstone: there was another man and the two girls with him. I was in the yard when they first came in. Then I came into the room where they were. I heard the prisoner sing. I thought it was very agreeable. He sung a good song. I took my beer and went and sat down facing him in the same box. One of the gentlewomen seemed to be found of my nosegay. I gave it her. She put me out a glass of cyder. They were very jocose together. We went into another room by ourselves to hear the ladies sing. They sang a little bit of a song, which was very agreeable. There was nothing but modesty on both sides. The girls did not appear to be there against their wills[.]

[…]

 

Richard Murrel: About five o'clock, or between five and six, that afternoon, the two girls and two men were in a hay-field belonging to Mr. Bocock at Haggerstone. The prisoner was one of them. […]

 

Q. How long might they be going cross the field?

 

Murrel: They might be a quarter of an hour. We called to them not to tumble the hay. I saw them go out of the field to the Bull. I went in at the Bull after that, and sat down, and had a glass of cyder. I heard the man sing. 

 

Q. Did you hear the women sing?

 

Murrel. No, I did not. 

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excerpt from 'Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 12 February 2019), June 1769, trial of Thomas Meller , otherwise Brooks (t17690628-8)' (430 words)

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