excerpt from 'An Essay on the Character, Manners, and Customs of the Peasantry of Cumberland; and Observations on the Style and Genius of the [poet Robert Anderson]' pp. lv–lvii (244 words)

excerpt from 'An Essay on the Character, Manners, and Customs of the Peasantry of Cumberland; and Observations on the Style and Genius of the [poet Robert Anderson]' pp. lv–lvii (244 words)

part of

An Essay on the Character, Manners, and Customs of the Peasantry of Cumberland; and Observations on the Style and Genius of the [poet Robert Anderson]

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

lv–lvii

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Among the peasantry of Cumberland, a Wedding-day is one continued scene of mirth and feasting, from morning till midnight.  Early in the day, the bridegroom, attended by a select party of his friends, well mounted, and all in their holiday dresses, proceed, at a quick trot, to the bride’s house, where the nuptial festival is always held.  On alighting, he takes a seat near his intended spouse, gives her a salute, and then joins the breakfasting company, in order to taste something more substantial, if not as fragrant, than a lady’s vermil lips.  After banqueting amidst all the luxuries of a tea-table, he and his friends re-mount their horses, and, accompanied by the bride and her retinue, proceed, at a steady pace, to the church, sometimes animated on the road by the strains of the violin or bagpipe.

“The pipers wind and take their post,
And go before to clear the coast.”

The Collier’s Wedding

 

The bridegroom, after he is indissolubly united to the maid of his choice, invites the company to the village ale-house, which is often but a few paces from the church; […] 

 

After dinner, the dancing commences, the glass circulates briskly round, to the health of the new-married couple; and slices of bride-cake are thrice, and sometimes oftener, put through the wedding-ring, and given to the unmarried youngsters, who place them under their pillows, in consequence of which, they have nothing but sweet dreams of love and marriage.

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excerpt from 'An Essay on the Character, Manners, and Customs of the Peasantry of Cumberland; and Observations on the Style and Genius of the [poet Robert Anderson]' pp. lv–lvii (244 words)

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reported in source

1658489060072

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