excerpt from 'Recollections of an old musician' (208 words)

excerpt from 'Recollections of an old musician' (208 words)

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Recollections of an old musician

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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On one memorable occasion Rubinstein and Wieniawski did me the honor to spend an evening at my house in Boston. A right royal musical evening it was, shared by about fifty artist and amateur guests. We made much music,—beginning with Rubinstein’s String Quintette in F, op. 57. Then we had the Rasoumoffski Quartette in F, op. 57, by Beethoven, with Wieniawski playing first violin. Then the Schumann Piano Quintette, with Rubinstein at the piano. Oh, it was a joy to take part with such a man and in such a work! and how Rubinstein did spur us on by his passionate way of playing some of the great parts! his power was fierce and tremendous. I think we all revelled in the sea of sound we made about us.

After the Quintette, Rubinstein played a lot of choice solo pieces, ending the evening with the Chopin Polonaise in A flat, op. 53, in which comes the wonderful passage for the left hand in octaves. He began the phrase very soft, then the “little-by-little crescendo” was most admirably done, finally reaching a fortissimo power which was quite colossal. It stirred us all up, and set even the chandelier to jingling in sympathy, and possibly in admiration.

On one memorable occasion Rubinstein and Wieniawski did me the honor to spend an evening at my house in Boston. A right royal musical evening it was, shared by about fifty artist and amateur guests. We made much music,—beginning with Rubinstein’s String Quintette in F, op. 57. Then we had the Rasoumoffski Quartette in F, op. 57, by Beethoven, with Wieniawski playing first violin. Then the Schumann Piano Quintette, with Rubinstein at the piano. Oh, it was a joy to take part with such a man and in such a work! and how Rubinstein did spur us on by his passionate way of playing some of the great parts! his power was fierce and tremendous. I think we all revelled in the sea of sound we made about us.

After the Quintette, Rubinstein played a lot of choice solo pieces, ending the evening with the Chopin Polonaise in A flat, op. 53, in which comes the wonderful passage for the left hand in octaves. He began the phrase very soft, then the “little-by-little crescendo” was most admirably done, finally reaching a fortissimo power which was quite colossal. It stirred us all up, and set even the chandelier to jingling in sympathy, and possibly in admiration.

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excerpt from 'Recollections of an old musician' (208 words)

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