excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 25 (223 words)

excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 25 (223 words)

part of

My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

25

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text excerpt

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The Crawshawbooth Choral Society commenced at the National School in November 1845, consisting of about 40 members, meeting once a week for practice, from the works of Handel, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. On Good Friday, 1846, a grand selection was performed from the above “Great Masters” with a choir of 60 performers. (Crawshawbooth Choral Society). The principals were; Richard Hacking esq of Bury, 1st Violin and leader, Dr. Wild of Burnley, 2nd Violin; Mr. James Openshaw of Bury, “Cello,” Mr. Sellers of Burnley, “Cello,” Mr. Tom Bradley of Accrington, Bass, Miss Parry of Manchester, Soprano, Mr. John Ashworth of Liverpool, Tenor, Mr. Mellor of Oldham, Bass. The Concert was considered to be of the "first water.” Mr. Hacking was of the firm of Walker & Hacking, machine makers. Hacking always had some musical friends working for him, so that he could have a practice at short notice. Openshaw was a “first class” performer on the “Cello,” and at this time was a surprise to all in his accompanyment [sic] of the “Recit” by bringing out Harmonies almost like an Organ. On one occasion Hacking and a few friends agreed to make Openshaw drunk, then to call a Concert and agreeing to make certain modulations contrary to copy. But their trick was a failure, for whatever they did, he always kept with them. This Society was dissolved on July 17, 1851.

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excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 25 (223 words)

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