excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 52 (208 words)

excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 52 (208 words)

part of

My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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52

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text excerpt

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I admire the old singers (the Deighn Layrocks, or Larks of Dean] - with all their faults for we must make great allowances for their doings, learning was at a very low ebb in their day. Had these men had the same chance of education as we now enjoy, no doubt they would have achieved greater things there is still the same blood in the valley, but I am sorry to say, they have not the same spirit of their forefather's. As a speciman [sic] - a few years ago, I went over to Lumb Chapel on purpose to hear the old tunes, but I was greatly disappointed. I said to a friend, How is it that they have sung those tunes so badly - Well, he said, the fact lies just here, the Choir were desired to sing the old tunes - which was against their mind, therefore they were careless about doing them right. My visit to Lumb, contrasts very much with Mr. Newbigging's Visit - when he tells of being so charmed at Lumb Charity Sermons, but I think they must have been at their best just then - for some time after - we hear of him deploring the change at Lumb Baptist Chapel.

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excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 52 (208 words)

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