excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 55–57 (457 words)

excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 55–57 (457 words)

part of

My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

55–57

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The death of Dr. Thomas Kay Whitehead of Greystone House, Rawtenstall, occurred on Sunday, September 10, 1882, and was interred at the Rawtenstall Cemetery, on Wednesday the 13th - The Rev. J.M. Mather conducted the service in the Haslingden Road chapel. Then he led the cartage [sic] to the cemetery - followed by the members of that place of worship, then came the officers of the Blue Ribbon Army and about 70 members (Mr.Whitehead being the President) then the Officers of the Ladies section of the Blue Ribbon Army. The Officers and members of the Good Templars Society. Doctors and gentlemen of the locality came to show their last tribute of respect to Mr. Whitehead, Great crowds lined both sides of the street.  All the shops, mills, schools, and public-houses on the route were closed.  At the close of Mr. Mather’s remarks, a verse of Mr. Whitehead’s favourite hymn was sung –

 

Let us gather up the sunbeams,
Lying all around our path,
Let us keep the wheat and roses,
Casting out the thorns and chaff,
Let us find our sweetest comfort,
In the blessings of today,
With a patient hand removing
All the briars from the way.

 

Chorus

 

Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
For our reaping by and by.

 

The Benediction then being pronounced the Gathering slowly and quietly dispersed. The Members of the Blue Ribbon Army returned to Greystone House, and the following hymn was sung.

 

I need thee every hour Most gracious Lord,
No tenderness like thine, Can peace afford,
I need thee, Oh, I need thee, Every hour I need
Oh, bless me now, my Saviour, I come to Thee.

 

On Sunday, September 17th, Mr. Mather preached the Funeral Sermon of Dr. Whitehead, the building which will hold 1,200 people was well filled in every part.  The choir was augmented from the other places of worship in the district.  The organist was Mr. F. Holt, who opened the service by playing the “Dead March,” after which Mr. Mather gave out the hymn –

 

When our heads are bowed with woe,
When our bitter tears o’erflow,
When we mourn the lost, the dear,
Jesu, son of David, hear.

 

After prayer and chant, Mr. Mather read the 11th Chapter of St. John, then the choir sang the Anthem “What are these arrayed in white,”, the second lesson was the 13th Chapter, 1st book of Corinthians, after which the following hymn was sung –

 

Give me the wings to rise, Within the veil I see,
The saints above, how great their joys, How bright their glories be.

 

Altogether it was a very solemn time for he had been “Everybody’s Friend” – Later an imposing monument was raised over his grave.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'My Life and Times, or An Old Man's Memories' pp. 55–57 (457 words)

1657882943622:

reported in source

1657882943622

documented in
Page data computed in 296 ms with 1,534,264 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.