excerpt from 'Letters on Italy; illustrated by engravings' pp. 61-62 (170 words)

excerpt from 'Letters on Italy; illustrated by engravings' pp. 61-62 (170 words)

part of

Letters on Italy; illustrated by engravings

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

61-62

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[Letter VIII]

The denomination of stanze or saloons, is applied to an establishment formed by the middle ranks of the city, in opposition to the cazina of the nobility; the latter, indeed, only comprises a small number of the community, and the nobles frequently abandon it for the stanze of the citizens, where more freedom and gaiety reign than in their own circle, over which, it is said, the pretensions of etiquette throw a coldness and constraint; the founders of the stanze bear all the expense, and admit such persons as are presented to them; here, for conversation, there are various rooms, which are filled with good company; here are news-rooms, billiard-rooms, ball-rooms, and also a garden; in short, nothing is wanting to render the place agreeable; the evening flies in circle of varied and decent amusements; the building communicates with one of the theatres, so you may walk thither under the arcade and hear a song, return and eat an ice, join in conversation, or figure in a dance.

 

[Letter VIII]

The denomination of stanze or saloons, is applied to an establishment formed by the middle ranks of the city, in opposition to the cazina of the nobility; the latter, indeed, only comprises a small number of the community, and the nobles frequently abandon it for the stanze of the citizens, where more freedom and gaiety reign than in their own circle, over which, it is said, the pretensions of etiquette throw a coldness and constraint; the founders of the stanze bear all the expense, and admit such persons as are presented to them; here, for conversation, there are various rooms, which are filled with good company; here are news-rooms, billiard-rooms, ball-rooms, and also a garden; in short, nothing is wanting to render the place agreeable; the evening flies in circle of varied and decent amusements; the building communicates with one of the theatres, so you may walk thither under the arcade and hear a song, return and eat an ice, join in conversation, or figure in a dance.

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excerpt from 'Letters on Italy; illustrated by engravings' pp. 61-62 (170 words)

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