excerpt from 'With Florestan in Australia and New Zealand, September/October 2001' pp. 111 (214 words)

excerpt from 'With Florestan in Australia and New Zealand, September/October 2001' pp. 111 (214 words)

part of

With Florestan in Australia and New Zealand, September/October 2001

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

111

type

text excerpt

encoded value

It's my task to introduce the Fauré again, and this time I speak about the first time I heard it played, when I wondered when the 'action' was going to begin, and gradually realising that it wasn't. I describe how I came to see that I had ruined it by having the wrong expectations of the piece, and how one has to give up the idea that a piece of music will be written in narrative form, with contrasting themes, intellectual development, mood changes, reconciliation of contrasting themes at the end, and so on. I say that for me listening to the Fauré trio is like that kind of time-lapse photography that one sees in nature programmes, where you watch a flower unfolding, and see everything in great detail. Nothing 'happens' apart from that process of flowering, which in itself is a beautiful thing to witness. As I speak, I see people gazing at me with deep attention, and I wonder once again whether there is any way to develop this kind of talking about music from the performer's point of view. I do have the impression that it's new to many people. Perhaps Dr Johnson would say, 'It is not done well, but one is surprised that it is done at all.'

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excerpt from 'With Florestan in Australia and New Zealand, September/October 2001' pp. 111 (214 words)

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