excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 5-6 (164 words)

excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 5-6 (164 words)

part of

Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

5-6

type

text excerpt

encoded value

My functions at the subscription concerts were of a different nature. I had taught myself the violin up to a certain degree, in the hope of being enrolled as an amateur second violin, but it so happened that the gentleman who played the kettle-drums left the town, and I, although seven years old, was considered so good a time- keeper that my father promoted me to that important and dangerous post. And for eight years did I hold it, though not altogether to my credit ; for although I found no difficulty in coming in at the right time, perhaps on the third beat after fifty-seven bars' rest, I could never accomplish a satisfactory roll, hard as I laboured at it. The kettle-drum is not exactly an instrument suited to a drawing-room, so I could get no practice, and I remember even now how I envied and admired the drummers of any military band that passed through our town, recognising them by far my superiors.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 5-6 (164 words)

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reported in source

1426866679584

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