excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 36 (161 words)

excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 36 (161 words)

part of

Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

36

type

text excerpt

encoded value

When I first knew him [Chopin] he was still a charming companion, gay and full of life ; a few years later his bodily decline began ; he grew weaker and weaker, to such a degree, that when we dined together at Leo's or at other friends' houses, he had to be carried upstairs, even to the first floor. His spirits and his mental energy remained, nevertheless, unimpaired, a proof of which he gave one evening, when, after having written his sonata for piano and violoncello, he invited a small circle of friends to hear it played by himself and Franchomme. On our arrival we found him hardly able to move, bent like a half opened penknife, and evidently in great pain. We entreated him to postpone the performance, but he would not hear of it ; soon he sat down to the piano, and as he warmed to his work, his body gradually resumed its normal position, the spirit having mastered the flesh.

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excerpt from 'Life and letters of Sir Charles Hallé; being an autobiography (1819-1860)' pp. 36 (161 words)

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