excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 277 (227 words)

excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 277 (227 words)

part of

Reminiscences of Michael Kelly

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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277

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text excerpt

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The 23rd January, 1813, Mr. Coleridge produced, at Drury Lane, his tragedy entitled "Remorse." There were some musical situations in the play which I had to compose. The poetry of the incantation was highly animating; it was sung by Mrs. Bland, with all the refreshing purity of her unsophisticated style, and with that chaste expression and tenderness of feeling which speak at once as it were to the heart. The chorus of boatmen chaunting on the water under the convent walls, and the distant peal of the organ, accompanying the monks while singing within the convent chapel, seemed to overcome and soothe the audience; thrilling sensation appeared to pervade the great mass of congregated humanity, and, during its performance, it was listened to with undivided attention, as if the minds and hearts of all were rivetted and enthralled by the combination presented to their notice; and at the conclusion the applause was loud and protracted.

I was fortunate enough to hear, from the highly-talented author of the play, that my music was every thing he could have wished. I felt this as a high compliment from Mr. Coleridge; for I understood, when he was in Sicily, and other parts of Italy, he had this "Miserere, Domine" set to music by different Italian composers, none of whom satisfied him by giving his poetry the musical expression which he desired.

The 23rd January, 1813, Mr. Coleridge produced, at Drury Lane, his tragedy entitled "Remorse." There were some musical situations in the play which I had to compose. The poetry of the incantation was highly animating; it was sung by Mrs. Bland, with all the refreshing purity of her unsophisticated style, and with that chaste expression and tenderness of feeling which speak at once as it were to the heart. The chorus of boatmen chaunting on the water under the convent walls, and the distant peal of the organ, accompanying the monks while singing within the convent chapel, seemed to overcome and soothe the audience; thrilling sensation appeared to pervade the great mass of congregated humanity, and, during its performance, it was listened to with undivided attention, as if the minds and hearts of all were rivetted and enthralled by the combination presented to their notice; and at the conclusion the applause was loud and protracted.

I was fortunate enough to hear, from the highly-talented author of the play, that my music was every thing he could have wished. I felt this as a high compliment from Mr. Coleridge; for I understood, when he was in Sicily, and other parts of Italy, he had this "Miserere, Domine" set to music by different Italian composers, none of whom satisfied him by giving his poetry the musical expression which he desired.

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excerpt from 'Reminiscences of Michael Kelly' pp. 277 (227 words)

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