excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 312 (181 words)

excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 312 (181 words)

part of

Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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312

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text excerpt

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I have at last heard Fannie Warburg in a Mozart concerto, for she has got back from England. How she did play it! To say that the passages "pearled," would be saying nothing at all. Why, the piano just warbled them out like a nightingale! The last movement had the infectious gayety that Mozart's things often have, with a magnificent cadenza by himself. She rendered it so perfectly, and with such naïve light-heartedness, that none of us could resist it, and we all finally burst into a laugh! There was a little orchestra accompanying, which Deppe had got together and was directing. When she got to the cadenza, he laid down his bâton, and retired to lean against the door and enjoy it. She did it in the most masterly manner, and O, it was so difficult! I thought of the Boston critic, who considered Mozart's compositions "child's play." They are child's play—that is, they are nothing at all if they are not faultlessly played, and every fault shows, which is the reason so few attempt them.

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excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 312 (181 words)

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