excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 242-243 (270 words)

excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 242-243 (270 words)

part of

Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

242-243

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Liszt sometimes strikes wrong notes when he plays, but it does not trouble him in the least. On the contrary, he rather enjoys it... It always amuses him instead of disconcerting him when he comes down squarely wrong, as it affords him an opportunity of displaying his ingenuity and giving things such a turn that the false note will appear simply a key leading to new and unexpected beauties. An accident of this kind happened to him in one of the Sunday matinees, when the room was full of distinguished people and of his pupils. He was rolling up the piano in arpeggios in a very grand manner indeed, when he struck a semi-tone short of the high note upon which he had intended to end. I caught my breath and wondered whether he was going to leave us like that, in mid-air, as it were, and the harmony unresolved, or whether he would be reduced to the humiliation of correcting himself like ordinary mortals, and taking the right chord. A half smile came over his face, as much as to say—"Don't fancy that this little thing disturbs me,"—and he instantly went meandering down the piano in harmony with the false note he had struck, and then rolled deliberately up in a second grand sweep, this time striking true. I never saw a more delicious piece of cleverness. It was so quick-witted and so exactly characteristic of Liszt. Instead of giving you a chance to say, "He has made a mistake," he forced you to say, "He has shown how to get out of a mistake."

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excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 242-243 (270 words)

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