excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 241-242 (237 words)

excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 241-242 (237 words)

part of

Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

241-242

type

text excerpt

encoded value

... Fräulein Remmertz was playing his E flat concerto to him [Liszt]. There were two grand pianos in the room, and she was sitting at one, and he at the other, accompanying and interpolating as he felt disposed. Finally they came to a place where there were a series of passages beginning with both hands in the middle of the piano, and going in opposite directions to the ends of the key-board, ending each time in a short, sharp chord. "Alles zum Fenster hinaus werfen (Pitch everything out of the window)," said he, in a cozy, easy sort of way, and he began playing these passages and giving every chord a whack as if he were splitting everything up and flinging it out, and that with such enjoyment, that you felt as if you'd like to bear a hand, too, in the work of general demolition! But I never shall forget Liszt's look as he so lazily proposed to "pitch everything out of the window." It reminded me of the expression of a big tabby-cat as it sits and purrs away, blinking its eyes and seemingly half asleep, when suddenly—!—! out it strikes with both its claws, and woe be to whatever is within its reach! Perhaps, after all, the secret of Liszt's fascination is this power of intense and wild emotion that you feel he possesses, together with the most perfect control over it.

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excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 241-242 (237 words)

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