excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 228 (153 words)

excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 228 (153 words)

part of

Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

228

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Liszt does such bewitching little things! The other day, for instance, Fräulein Gaul was playing something to him, and in it were two runs, and after each run two staccato chords. She did them most beautifully, and struck the chords immediately after. "No, no," said Liszt, "after you make a run you must wait a minute before you strike the chords, as if in admiration of your own performance. You must pause, as if to say, 'How nicely I did that.'" Then he sat down and made a run himself, waited a second, and then struck the two chords in the treble, saying as he did so "Bra-vo," and then he played again, struck the other chord, and said again "Bra-vo," and positively, it was as if the piano had softly applauded! That is the way he plays everything. It seems as if the piano were speaking with a human tongue.

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excerpt from 'Music-Study in Germany: The Classic Memoir of the Romantic Era' pp. 228 (153 words)

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