excerpt from 'A Tour to North Wales, 1793' pp. 248–250 (238 words)

excerpt from 'A Tour to North Wales, 1793' pp. 248–250 (238 words)

part of

A Tour to North Wales, 1793

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

248–250

type

text excerpt

encoded value

I am now arrived at Corwen, New Inn; and found it occupy’d by Sr. J.L. and suite, in great pomp, and parade, and by valets, in greenand red, and gold!!  […]  The harper play’d away, upon the stairs, at the command of Sr. J.L.; and I had an equal advantage: This harper was far superior to Mr Evan of Llangollen, who was an heavy-handed beast, without any genius.  […]

 The harper play’d but a short time; owing, as they told me, to the snapping of his strings: This may be truth; but I hope he will give me more at supper time.

 Think of being confined, alone, at a dreary inn; and suppose that it should continue raining; […]  Such an evening would gloom a resident in Pall-Mall; what then is to become of a being shut up in a Welsh village, looking at their dirt, and their dunghills?  And my poor horses quiver at the end of a long dismal stable, built at the foot of a rocky mountain!  Upon the summit of which stood Owen Glendowers Chair: […]

 Now for the blind harper Edward Jones, to chear me; and he came in, and took his seat: Understanding but little Englishwe puzzled each other exceedingly; nor could we converse about the bards, the Druids, and Owen Glendower.  These harpers will introduce variations, and spoil their tunes; which should be play’d simply, and manfully.

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excerpt from 'A Tour to North Wales, 1793' pp. 248–250 (238 words)

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